Keto Pumpkin Scones


Allergen and Diet Summary

Vegetarian
Ketogenic
Dairy-Free
Eggs-Free
Gluten-Free

Recipe Categories

Nutrients

NutrientGramsRDA
Carbs5.7g1.9%
of which Sugars3g3.3%
Fats14.7g22.6%
of which Saturates3.1g15.5%
Proteins7.9g17.1%
Fibers7.3g29.2%
* All data is per serving
Keto Pumpkin Scones Recipe with Cream Cheese Preview

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Are you following the keto diet? Or maybe you're after some energizing gluten-free and low-sugar treats for your breakfast. We are so glad you are here then, as we have designed this recipe just for you. Our gluten-free keto pumpkin scones are wonderfully nutritious while only giving you 3% of sugars and 2% of carbs.

With carefully selected ingredients, these tasty triangles provide you with everything you need to set your day off to a great start while keeping your diet on track. Let's take a quick look at the health benefits packed in these pumpkin scones. 

Our homemade pumpkin puree gives us naturally-sweet flavour without the need for added sugars. However, if you have a bit of a sweet tooth, you can use erythritol or other zero-sugar sweeteners, as we did. Thanks to the erythritol, these pumpkin scones are also suitable for people with diabetes

Many stores sell canned pumpkin puree, but it's easy to make it yourself using fresh pumpkins. We show you how below.

Pumpkin is an excellent choice on a keto diet, as long as you consume it in moderation. While a portion of this veggie has very few carbs, it is rich in antioxidants like beta-carotene and vitamin A. Did you know that 100 grams of pumpkin equal 100% of your recommended daily dose (RDA) of vitamin A? This vitamin is essential to promote good vision, a healthy heart, and a robust immune system [1]

To add some healthy fats, we used a combination of almond and coconut flour, chopped almond nuts, and dairy-free cream cheese. 

Coconut is a rich source of fats and an excellent ingredient in vegan and keto desserts. At a glance, coconut is rich in saturated fats. But evidence shows that these fats are not as unhealthy as the other saturated fats [2]. In fact, the fatty acids in coconut increase the good cholesterol, a property shared by other healthy unsaturated fats, like omega-3 or those from extra virgin olive oil.

Almonds are a little miracle of nature. These delicate nuts burst with essential minerals and vitamin E, and they are loaded with healthy unsaturated fats. If you have to decrease bad cholesterol or lower blood sugar levels, you must incorporate almonds in your diet. 

Finally, we used dairy-free cream cheese for extra softness and added proteins. If you want to make this recipe vegan, substitute the lactose-free cow cheese for vegan cream cheese, or try our cashew "cream-cheese" used in our vegan cream cheese cookies recipe. 

Ingredients


ALLERGY ADVICE Allergens are marked in bold
Fresh Pumpkin200 g
Coconut Flour100 g
Almond Flour150 g
Baking Powder9 g
Salt1 pinch
Cinnamon0.5 tsp
Ginger0.25 tsp
Clove0.25 tsp
Erythritol35 g
Dairy-Free Cream Cheese80 g
Almonds20 g
Pumpkin Seeds8 g

step 1

Although you can buy canned pumpkin puree, you can easily make it at home yourself.

Peel fresh pumpkin, remove the seeds and dice it into cubes. Add them a pan and pour enough water to cover the pumpkin chunks.

Then bring to a boil and cook covered for 10 minutes or until the pumpkin is soft and can be easily poked through with a fork.

Drain excess water and transfer the chunks into a food processor. Blitz until you have a smooth puree. In an alternative, you can use a potato masher to mash the cooked pumpkin into a soft paste.

Finally, allow to cool down in the fridge for 10 minutes, and you're ready to use the pumpkin puree.

Pumpkin puree

step 2

In a mixing bowl, combine first the dry ingredients, namely the coconut flour, almond flour, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, ginger, clove, and erythritol.

Then, incorporate the prepared pumpkin puree and the dairy-free cream cheese.

Work the ingredients until they come together into a dough. Make sure it is moist yet hard enough for you to handle it with ease. If needed, add more almond flour or a splash of almond milk or water.

Keto pumpkin scones dough made with almond flour, coconut flour, cream cheese, pureed pumpkin and erythritol.

step 3

Transfer the scones dough to a working surface dusted with little flour.

Roll it out into a rounded shape 3 cm (1.2 inches) thick.

Then, use a sharp knife or wheel cutter to cut the pumpkin dough into as many triangles as the number of servings, like pizza slices.

Keto pumpkin scones dough sliced

step 4

Transfer the pumpkin triangles onto a baking tray lined with parchment paper and garnish with finely chopped almonds and pumpkin seeds (1).

Bake the scones for 20 minutes in the oven at 190°C (374°F) or 175°C (347°F) for fan ovens until golden (2).

Then, transfer them onto a wire rack to cool down evenly.

1
Keto pumpkin scones in baking tray with almonds and pumpkin seeds.
2
Step 4.2 of Keto Pumpkin Scones Recipe with Cream Cheese

FAQ

Can I freeze pumpkin scones?

Our keto pumpkin scones are rich in healthy fats, which make them well suited for the freezer. 

The higher the ratio of fats to water, the less it will take for food to thaw once frozen. Fats keep the scones dough chewy and soft, letting you take a bite a few minutes out of the freezer, whereas low-fat scones would turn into a block of ice. 

To freeze, place the scones into plastic bags or a box. Try not to overlap the scones and keep them flat to preserve the toppings and prevent them from sticking to one another. 

An alternative is to freeze enough dough to make one or more batches of scones. Take out a portion of dough the day before and let it defrost in the fridge. Then use as indicated in the recipe above and enjoy fresh pumpkin scones every time! 

Are pumpkin scones good for people with diabetes?

If you crave pumpkin scones but suffer from diabetes or are on a low-sugar diet, you can't pop into a Starbucks to satisfy that craving. Fear not!

Our mission at Foodaciously is to help people with allergies and special diets to enjoy the same tasty food as everyone else.

And the good news is, our pumpkin scones recipe above is perfect for people with diabetes, as we haven't used any added sugars. 

A note on pumpkins if you have diabetes. This vegetable is suitable for you if you eat it in moderation. Take a look at the glycemic values of pumpkin to understand why. The orange veggie has a high glycemic index (GI) of 75, but the glycemic load (GL) is just 3.

The GI tells us how fast and drastically a particular food can raise blood sugar levels. On the other hand, the GL quantifies this rise based on how many carbs that food is giving you. In simple terms, pumpkin could raise your blood sugar levels quite fast, but there are so few carbs in a standard serving that this increase is almost undetectable.

Another ingredient we used that is brilliant for a diabetes-diet is erythritol. Because our bodies cannot break down erythritol, we get to taste the sweet without affecting our blood sugar levels at all. It delivers a whopping 70% of sweetness while only giving 6% of carbs compared to plain sugar [3] - magic stuff.

In conclusion, our low-carb pumpkin scones are suited for people with diabetes if eaten in moderation. Just don't eat a whole batch at once!

What type of pumpkin is best for scones?

Thanks to their flavourful and sweet flesh, butternut squash and sugar pie pumpkin make the best pumpkin options to prepare these scones.

Although you can easily find canned pumpkin at the supermarket ready to use in those recipes that call for pumpkin puree, we explain how to make it from scratch from a fresh whole pumpkin in our recipe above.

When it comes to baking and cooking, it's essential to choose the best type of pumpkin for the best results. Those big and rounded pumpkins you see carved out at Halloween are field pumpkins. Even if they are edible, they are not ideal for recipes are they are quite bland and watery. Instead, sweet and fleshy varieties, like butternut squash, make the best choice for cooking with this delicious vegetable.

What makes these pumpkin scones good for you?

Compared to the classic recipe, these pumpkin scone recipe definitely makes a healthier option. Pumpkin puree, zero-calorie erythritol, and low-carb flours are what makes this sweet treat good for you.

By using pumpkin puree, we have replaced part of the fats. Pumpkin is an excellent substitute for eggs and oil in baked goods, meaning you'll eat fewer calories and saturated fats. Also, this vegetable offers healthy nutrients, like fibres and antioxidants.

Erythritol is a no sugar sweetener that can satisfy your sweet tooth without adding extra calories. We love using this ingredient to make low-carb recipes which are keto-friendly and suitable to people with diabetes.

Finally, we have used almond and coconut flour as a gluten-free alternative to wheat flour. They add healthy fats and proteins and, by being low in carbs, they make you feel full for longer, suppressing cravings.

Thanks to all these healthy substitutions, our pumpkin scones have half the saturated fats, half the sugars, and eight times fewer carbs than the original recipe. Each of these delicious triangles provides only 200 calories, 3g of sugars, and 5g of carbs.

We have designed this recipe to be ketogenic. This type of diet relies on fats as the primary source of energy [4]. Therefore, if you want to make this dessert even healthier, then you can swap cream cheese with soy yogurt for a recipe lower in saturated fats.

Tips

  • Erythritol is a keto-friendly sweetener, but it's 70% as sweet as sugar. We have calculated 35g of erythritol for the default servings as an equivalent to 25 grams of white sugar. However, we recommend you check the packet instructions if you're in doubt.

  • You can brush the scones with almond milk before garnishing them to give them a nice golden look once baked.